• Ms. Elliot's Social Studies Class



     

     
Ms. Elliot

Phone: 863-983-1530

Email:

Degrees and Certifications:

Ms. Elliot

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  •  What are we learning this year?  

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    1. Geography of the United States
    Essential Question: What can geography teach us about the United States?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students work in pairs to label features on maps and a diagram. They define geographic terms and apply them to the geography of the United States.

    Reading Further: Where Geography Meets History

    2. American Indians and Their Land
    Essential Question: How did American Indians adapt to different environments in North America?

    In a Visual Discovery activity, students work in pairs, using maps and photographs to trace migration routes of the first Americans and to summarize how these groups adapted to different environments.

    Reading Further: Recording Lakota History

    3. American Indian Cultural Regions
    Essential Question: How and why did American Indian cultural regions differ?

    In a Response Group activity, students analyze historical artifacts from different American Indian groups and then compare and contrast life in the various regions.

    Reading Further: Four Young American Indians

    4. How and Why Europeans Came to the New World
    Essential Question: What did explorers take to and from the New World during the Age of Exploration?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, pairs take on the role of underwater archaeologists to examine objects from an explorer’s sunken ship and categorize them as navigation tools, motives for exploration, or new products from the Americas.

    Reading Further: Changes in Europe Spur Exploration

    5. Routes of Exploration to the New World
    Essential Question: How did exploration of the Americas lead to settlement?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students use an illustrated classroom matrix to organize information about European explorers and then play a game in which they answer questions about the explorers.

    Reading Further: Who Wins Florida?

    6. Early English Settlements
    Essential Question: What challenges faced the first English colonies?

    In a Visual Discovery activity, students analyze images of Roanoke, Jamestown, and Plymouth to create act-it-outs that show why settlers came, the hardships they endured, and the reasons why each settlement succeeded or failed.

    Reading Further: King Philip Decides on War

    7. Comparing the Colonies
    Essential Question: How were the three colonial regions alike and different? In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity, students create a billboard for one of six British colonies and then try to persuade other students to settle in their colony. Reading Further: Choosing a Career in the Colonies

    8. Slavery in the Americas
    Essential Question: What was the impact of slavery on Africans?

    In a Response Group activity, student groups analyze and respond to three dilemmas faced by Africans during enslavement: trading slaves for guns in West Africa, surviving the Middle Passage, and living as a slave in the colonies.

    Reading Further: How Slaves Kept Hope Alive

    9. Life in Colonial Williamsburg
    Essential Question: What were key parts of life for Southern colonists in the 1700s?

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, students take a “walking tour” of colonial Williamsburg to examine aspects of colonial life, such as government, social life, and religion.

    Reading Further: A Religious Revival in the Colonies

    10. Tensions Grow Between the Colonies and Great Britain
    Essential Question: What were key parts of life for Southern colonists in the 1700s?

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, students take a “walking tour” of colonial Williamsburg to examine aspects of colonial life, such as government, social life, and religion.

    Reading Further: A Religious Revival in the Colonies

    11. To Declare Independence or Not
    Essential Question: What were the arguments for and against colonial independence from Great Britain?

    In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity, student groups represent six historical figures in a panel debate between Loyalists and Patriots.

    Reading Further: Patrick Henry, Radical Revolutionary

    12. The Declaration of Independence
    Essential Question: What are the main ideas in the Declaration of Independence?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students examine objects on Thomas Jefferson’s desk, such as a letter and an invitation, to learn about the events and ideas that led to Jefferson’s drafting of the Declaration of Independence.

    Reading Further: Jefferson’s Conflict: Ideas vs. Reality

    13. The American Revolution
    Essential Question: How did the colonists win the American Revolution?

    In an Experiential Exercise, students engage in a tug-of-war that demonstrates factors that helped the American colonies win the American Revolution.

    Reading Further: The Revolution’s Home Front

    14. The Constitution
    Essential Question: What are the key features of the U.S. Constitution?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students play a game in which they are presented with a series of situations that the government might face and determine which branch or branches of government will resolve each situation.

    Reading Further: Inside the Constitutional Convention

    15. The Bill of Rights
    Essential Question: What are the basic rights and freedoms of the American people?

    In an Experiential Exercise, students work in small groups to create tableaux vivants, or living scenes, to represent key amendments in the Bill of Rights.

    Reading Further: Individual Rights vs. Society’s Needs

    16. Our Role in Government
    Essential Question: What does it mean to be a citizen of the United States?

    In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity, students follow an inquiry process to identify a local issue and suggest solutions in a multimedia presentation.

    Reading Further: How Students Make a Difference

    17. Shaping America’s Economy
    Essential Question: How did the Founding Fathers create the economy we use today?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students interpret excerpts from the Constitution. They evaluate how the Constitution provides a foundation for our free enterprise system.

    Reading Further: The Rise of Cotton in the South

    18. Manifest Destiny and Settling the West
    Essential Question: How did the expansion of the United States affect people inside and outside the country?

    In an Experiential Exercise, students act as 19th-century settlers and migrate into the western territories of an outline of the United States.

    Reading Further: The Cherokee Trail of Tears

    19. The Diverse Peoples of the West
    Essential Question: What drew new settlers to the western part of the United States in the 1800s?

    In a Problem Solving Groupwork activity, students create interactive dramatizations about the experiences of six groups of people who lived in or moved to the West in the 1800s and how these groups were helped or harmed by the westward expansion of the United States.

    Reading Further: Laura Ingalls Wilder on the Prairie

    20. The Causes of the Civil War
    Essential Question: What factors helped drive apart the North and the South in the mid-1800s?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder, students use a metaphor to compare prewar events with a story about a brother and sister who disagree. Then students complete an illustrated storybook to reflect the growing tensions between the North and the South.

    Reading Further: Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Book

    21. The Civil War
    Essential Question: What factors contributed to the outcome of the Civil War?

    In a Writing for Understanding activity, students take a “walking tour” to visit five sites at the battlefield at Gettysburg in July 1863 and examine and take notes on written and visual information about aspects of the Civil War, such as military tactics and technology and combat conditions.

    Reading Further: Life After Slavery in the South

    22. The American Industrial Revolution
    Essential Question: How did industrialization change the United States?

    In a Social Studies Skill Builder activity, students analyze primary source images and data related to industrialization.

    Reading Further: Buying Goods: Then and Now

    23. The Modern United States
    Essential Question: How has life in the United States changed since industrialization?